Review: Mojo & The Mythies


https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=2716905755/size=small/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/track=1208678803/transparent=true/

Some of you might be familiar with Mojo the Cat. Most of you probably are not.  And the whole idea of Catcore may seem absurd to many, but there is something strangely intoxicating with the music of this remarkable feline.  I’ve beed a fan of Mojo the Cat since first being introduced to her unique music through FAWM.  But I have to say that when Mojo decided to team up with Pop Mythology‘s founder & editor Daniel (more commonly known on the ‘Net as The Pop Mythologist) to help him with his medical treatment costs, I knew this was something special.

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Rememberance…

Yesterday was Rememberance Day here in Canada.  At the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month we pause for two minutes of silence to remember all those who have sacrificed themselves in times of war so that we may enjoy our freedom.  From the Boar War at the turn of the 20th Century to the current conflict against ISIS in Syria & Iraq, our Armed forces have fought to uphold the principals of our country & to keep our way of life safe from tyranny & terror.

On November 11, 2007 I recorded an improvisation to commemorate Rememberance Day.  I share it with you today, so that we keep the sacrifice of our armed forces in our minds – even after Remembrance Day has passed.  Please enjoy the song & show your gratitude to our Veterans & our currently serving members of the Armed Forces.

Rememberance Improv 2007

Thom Yorke’s Reflections On Radiohead’s Street Spirit (Fade Out)

Thom: “Street Spirit is our purest song, but I didn’t write it. It wrote itself. We were just its messengers; its biological catalysts. Its core is a complete mystery to me, and, you know, I wouldn’t ever try to write something that hopeless. All of our saddest songs have somewhere in them at least a glimmer of resolve. Street Spirit has no resolve. It is the dark tunnel without the light at the end. It represents all tragic emotion that is so hurtful that the sound of that melody is its only definition. We all have a way of dealing with that song. It’s called detachment. Especially me; I detach my emotional radar from that song, or I couldn’t play it. I’d crack. I’d break down on stage. That’s why its lyrics are just a bunch of mini-stories or visual images as opposed to a cohesive explanation of its meaning. I used images set to the music that I thought would convey the emotional entirety of the lyric and music working together. That’s what’s meant by ‘all these things you’ll one day swallow whole’. I meant the emotional entirety, because I didn’t have it in me to articulate the emotion. I’d crack… Our fans are braver than I to let that song penetrate them, or maybe they don’t realise what they’re listening to. They don’t realise that Street Spirit is about staring the fucking devil right in the eyes, and knowing, no matter what the hell you do, he’ll get the last laugh. And it’s real, and true. The devil really will get the last laugh in all cases without exception, and if I let myself think about that too long, I’d crack. I can’t believe we have fans that can deal emotionally with that song. That’s why I’m convinced that they don’t know what it’s about. It’s why we play it towards the end of our sets. It drains me, and it shakes me, and hurts like hell every time I play it, looking out at thousands of people cheering and smiling, oblivious to the tragedy of its meaning, like when you’re going to have your dog put down and it’s wagging its tail on the way there. That’s what they all look like, and it breaks my heart. I wish that song hadn’t picked us as its catalysts, and so I don’t claim it. It asks too much. I didn’t write that song.”

Future Plans & Ongoing Projects… Including A FAWM 2016 Preview

TG4 Front Cover - 1429x1417px 300ppi JPEG

As I mentioned in my last blog post, I got a little sidetracked when my buddy Jim asked me about some old recordings I had.  I am still working on digitizing & re-mastering my Master Tape Archive from all the bands I was a part of in the late nineties.  So that is one project on the go.  I still have to edit Acts II-IV of The Good Four so that I can release them.  And my mind is starting to think about what I plan to do for FAWM this coming February.

It is on this last topic that I think I’m going to delve into today.

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From The Vault…

I know things here at Candle Experience Dot Com have been really quiet for the last couple of months.  Sorry about that.  But I have gotten side-tracked on a bit of a historical exploration.  It all started when my buddy Jim (of Hellenica & The Golden Tombs) asked me if I had any recordings from our days when we played together in the Winnipeg experiemental-rock band Hellinacopter.  Well I did.

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It’s Finally Here

Act I of the The Good Four is now released on Candle’s Official YouTube Channel. Enjoy!

Review: A Gentle Fire By Hellenica

On the heals of the album Blood Moon Wolf Head, Jim Demos has released a new track via his solo project HellenicaA Gentle Fire is a mellow, almost introspective track.  It begins with a simple chord arpeggio which is the rhythmic foundation of the track.  A rumbling bass synth enters accompanied by a passionate drum track & suddenly the listener is taken on a journey.  It seems as if we are travelling through time, through some ancient ruins found on the hellenic coast.  There is a sense a majesty & ancient power here – as if those Greek heroes & gods of legend look down upon us now: inciting us to rise above our mundane lives.

Jim has had a varied career as a musician.  He has toured Canada, the US & parts of Europe with a number of bands including Ham & National Monument.  He grew up in Winnipeg & was a high profile member of that city’s avant-garde music scene in the late nineties & early two thousands.  He now lives & works in Montreal & has integrated himself into that city’s diverse musical culture.